July 21, 2012

I’m doing research for a paper I’m writing on my visit to the Creation Museum in Kentucky. As part of the research, I read a short pocket guide I purchased from their book store, entitled, ‘A Young Earth: Evidence that supports the biblical perspective’. It focuses on alleged problems with radioactive dating techniques, carbon-14 dating, and the related issues of concern in determining the age of the earth. Below is an excerpt from the last chapter of this book, ‘Trusting in Authority’:

‘Many will interview leading scientists and researchers to present an air of authority, but what if the authority figure has an agenda?

Actually, everyone who presents information to you has an agenda. The information we get from these sources is not the raw data, it is usually a conclusion about the data. The conclusions are always colored by some sort of bias- despite claims of neutrality.

Take a fossil find as an example. The fossil is simply pieces of rock or other material found in the ground. This evidence cannot speak for itself- it must be interpreted! It is quite easy to identify the bias of interpretation by looking for certain clues. Phrases such as “common ancestor” and “million years” tell you that the authority relies on an evolutionary philosophy to explain the fossil. Words like “Designer” and “created” tell you that the authority relies on the Bible to understand the fossil. Both have a bias when interpreting the data.’ (-pages 93-94, A Pocket Guide to a Young Earth)

I really enjoyed stumbling upon this excerpt. I think because somewhere deep down, even the relativist in me knows there are some thoughtful, relevant qualifications to be made; some seemingly subtle, yet worthwhile points of clarification that can be made here. And, I think, there can be a way to craft those points that wouldn’t alienate anyone with an agenda that prioritizes genuine understanding, regardless of their point of original reference.

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